Wilhelm Hauff

Portrait of Wilhelm Hauff

Wilhelm Hauff was a German poet and novelist. He was born in Stuttgart, Germany on 29th November 1802 and died there on 18th November 1827 aged 25.

Major Works

“Die Karawane” (The Caravan) (1825) 
“Der Zwerg Nase”
 (Dwarf Nose) (1826) 
“Der kleine Muck” (Little Muck” (1826) 
Lichtenstein: Romantische Saga aus der Wuerttembergerischen Geschichte” (Lichtenstein: Romantic Saga from the History of Württemberg) (1826)
“Mitteilungen aus den Memoiren des Satans” (Pronouncements from the Memoirs of Satan) (1826)
Phantasien im Bremer Ratskeller” (The Wine-Ghosts of Bremen) (1827)

Biography Timeline

Wilhelm Hauff was born on 29th November 1802 in Stuttgart, Württemberg, Germany. His father was August Friedrich Hauff an official in the Württemberg Ministry of Foreign Affairs. His mother was Hedwig Wilhelmine Elsaesser Hauff. He was the second of four children. 

1809: His father dies and his mother and her children move in with her father in Tubingen. Wilhelm teaches himself largely through reading in his grandfather’s library.

1818: He is sent to the Klosterschule at Blaubeiren, near the city of Ulm. 

1820: He enters the University of Tubingen where he studies philosophy and religious studies.

1824: He passes his university course and gets a position teaching the children of General Baron Ernst Eugen von Hugel, the Minister of War in Württemberg. He beings writing his “Marchen” (Fairy Tales) for the children which would later be published in 1826.

1825: He writes “Der Mann im Mond” (The Man in the Moon) as a parody of the sentimental novels of Heinrich Clauren then popular. Clauren sues him for damages and the following year he replies with the sarcastic comedy “Kontroverspredigt über H. Clauren und den Mann im Mond” (The Controversy of H Clauren and the Man in the Moon).

1826: He begins work on “Mitteilungen aus den Memoiren des Satans” (Pronouncements from the Memoirs of Satan) which is strongly influenced by the works of E.T.A. Hoffman. He travels to France and the Netherlands and writes the second part of “The Memoiren des Satan”. Several of his fairy tales are published in “Märchenalmanach auf das Jahr 1826”. (Fairytale Almanac of 1826). (published as “Tales of the Caravan, Inn, and Palace” in the United States of America). Influenced by the works of Walter Scott he embarks on a historical fantasy novel called “Lichtenstein: Romantische Saga aus der Wuerttembergerischen Geschichte” (Lichtenstein: Romantic Saga from the History of Württemberg) which proves very popular with the public and aristocracy alike. He also writes novellas including “Die Bettlerin vom Pont des Arts” (The True Lover’s Fortune; or, the Beggar of the Pont des Arts)

1827: In January he becomes the Editor of the “Stuttgart Morgenblatt” (Stuttgart Morning Paper) owned by J.F. Cotta. In February he marries his cousin, Luise Hauff. His popular novella “Phantasien im Bremer Ratskeller” (The Wine-Ghosts of Bremen) is published along with “Jud Suss” (Süss the Jew).

Wilhelm Hauff died prematurely of typhoid on 18th November 1827, in Stuttgart, Germany. He was buried in the Hoppenlau-Freidhof (Hoppenlau Cemetery in Stuttgart. His novellas were collected together and published in three volumes in 1828 as “Novellen”. His “Sämtliche Werke” (Collected Works) began to be published in 1830.

Further Information

List of books by Hauff.